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LinkedIn enters PSE marketing with university pages

October 31st, 2013 | No Comments | Posted in Education, Social Media

The business-networking behemoth LinkedIn said on Monday morning that it was making a play in global college admissions, unveiling LinkedIn University Pages and welcoming school students as young as 14 as members.

The company said the new pages could help colleges build their brands and recruit students who fit what they offer. It said the pages can also help students choose colleges on the basis of the students’ intended careers and, subsequently, help with job searches. The pages take advantage of career data that LinkedIn has collected from some 240 million members around the world.

The company gave about 200 colleges and universities advance notice to create accounts. The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor’s page has an aerial view of the campus, 196,952 followers, and a link to an article about renovated residence halls on the university’s East Quadrangle. Drexel University’s page offers a collage of campus scenes and a link to a USA Today article about two Drexel students who created a mobile app to help other students track down potential scholarships.

Search for an institution that didn’t get the heads-up, and you see a breakdown of information about its alumni who are LinkedIn members, along with a note saying that the institution’s page “isn’t quite ready yet.” Look for California State Polytechnic University at Pomona, for instance, and you get a page saying LinkedIn has connections to 57,916 alumni, the largest group of whom—7,598—work in engineering, while 31,255 live in and around Los Angeles.

blog post by LinkedIn’s director of product management, Christina Allen, says the idea for LinkedIn University Pages grew out of the struggle that her daughter and her daughter’s friends went through to choose colleges. “Through my relationships at LinkedIn, I knew that hidden in millions of member profiles were powerful insights about the career outcomes of educations from universities around the world,” Ms. Allen writes. These insights, she says, “could provide incredible value for students—helping them explore possible futures and build a support network to help them succeed on campus and beyond.”

Tips to Maximize Your End-of-Year Fundraising

October 30th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted in Fundraising

Did you know organizations could raise 40% of their individual donations in the month of December by maximizing their end-of-year fundraising appeals?

In fact, data shows more dollars are donated online in the last five days of December than in the other three weeks combined. For most organizations — particularly those who solicit tax-deductible gifts — the year’s online fundraising is a pie with six slices:

  • The first slice comprises the first fiscal quarter, January to March
  • The second slice comprises the second fiscal quarter, April to June
  • The third slice comprises the third fiscal quarter, July to September
  • The fourth slice comprises the first two months of the last fiscal quarter, October and November.
  • The fifth slice comprises December 1 through approximately Christmas
  • And the sixth and final slice comprises just a very few crucial days: the last week of the year.

So, with one-third of the year’s fundraising yet to be served in the month ahead, how can you make sure that you get yours?

By far the most important thing to do is …

Ask, Ask, Ask

Plan to ask by email at least twice (we suggest three or more times) before Dec. 25. And really plan to hit the last week of the year with at least three asks. Ask more than that if you can! December is not the time to be bashful.

  • Ask on Saturday, Dec. 31. You should always email at least one fundraising ask on New Year’s Eve, which might be more lucrative in a few hours than some entire months elsewhere on the calendar.
  • Ask at least twice in the Dec. 27 – Dec. 30 span. (Many people will have Monday, Dec. 26 off as their Christmas holiday.)

Keep It Simple

Your email has, at best, a few seconds to prove its relevance to the potential donor.

  • Succinct. (Emails should rarely exceed 500 words.)
  • Direct. Don’t bury the ask, or weaken it by mixing in links to non-donation actions.
  • Powerful. Ask the heart, not the head. An image really is worth a thousand … bucks.
  • Repetitious. Link to the donation page multiple times – early, middle, and late in the text, plus any sidebars or buttons.

Cross Your Channels

Email is still the go-to fundraising tool for most organizations, but ask everywhere else you’re online, too.

  • Ask on Facebook.
  • Ask on Twitter … and repeat that Tweet.
  • Ask on your website. It’s not just email subscribers who’ll donate! Get a donation pitch front-and-center on your home page and any other typical entry pages.

Check out our infographic for a look at more stats and figures on end-of-year fundraising.

End-of-Year Fundraising

August 12, 2013

by Beth Johnson, Communication Manager, Salsa

 

Laval student wins lawsuit for lost tuition during Maple Spring protests

October 29th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted in Canada, Education

Marc-Antoine Dumas sued history students’ association over student strike

Former Laval University student Marc-Antoine Dumas has won his lawsuit against his former student association for lost tuition fees.

A Quebec judge has ordered the Laval University history students’ association to pay back Dumas’ tuition fees, which he lost after abandoning his term.

Dumas said every time he tried to attend his classes, he was blocked by protesters.

He said he waited until the last minute to drop his courses, hoping the strike would end. However, the university refused to refund his tuition fees because he missed the deadline.

“I sent an injunction to the student association, because I considered it responsible for the fact that I had to abandon my term,” Dumas said.

The judge agreed with Dumas and ordered the student association to pay him more than $1,200.

Student groups worry about precedent

Student associations worry that the decision, rendered in the small-claims division of Quebec Court, could set a precedent.

“We are studying the court case,” said Antoine Genest-Grégoire, the president of one of the largest federation of student groups, the Fédération étudiante universitaire du Québec (FEUQ). “Obviously, it’s alarming.”

300-morasseFormer student Jean-François Morasse says he is weighing the possibility of seeking redress from the student tuition fee protests in small-claims court.

A spokesman for the student group ASSÉ, Benjamin Gingras, said he’s confident a small-claims court judgment will not set a precedent.

However, Gingras said it’s disappointing that a student would use the legal system to fight a decision that was the result of a vote by his fellow students.

Another student who turned to the courts in 2012 to try to force his fellow students to allow him access to his classes, Jean-François Morasse, said he is looking into launching a suit in small-claims court.

He said it would not surprise him if other students opposed to the strike went down the same path.

“There were terms lost, diplomas lost, delays getting into the job market,” Morasse said.

CBC News Posted: Aug 16, 2013 4:56 PM ET

Parents say choice of institution, major comes down to cost, earning potential

October 28th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted in Education

The financial burden of paying for college has families cost-cutting before their kids even apply to schools. And it’s affecting students’ decisions about not only where to go, but what to study, according to survey data given exclusively to USA TODAY.

The survey by Discover Student Loans, to be released Thursday, found that nearly half of adults are limiting their child’s college choices based on price. And with rising student loan debt and a job market that continues to greet college grads with not-so-open arms, the ability to find employment has become a top factor in deciding what to study. The number of adults who say earning potential is more important to their child’s education than what they major in is up, at 42% vs. 38% last year, the survey shows.

Discover Student Loans surveyed 1,000 adults with college-bound children ages 16 to 18.

The economic downturn, along with steadily rising tuition and student loan debt, has pushed the conversation about affordability to the beginning of the college application process, says Mark Kantrowitz, publisher of the Edvisors Network of websites about planning and paying for college.

“College in the past has been kind of unique in that you decide which college you go to before you know how much it will cost you or whether you can afford it. For the longest time, families were kind of ignoring the college cost.”

Now cost is often the deciding factor. Several recent surveys show how much finances are weighing on practically every aspect of applying to colleges. The amount of money parents can contribute to their child’s education has dropped. Parents’ income and savings cover less than a third of the cost of college, compared with 37% in 2010, according to Sallie Mae’s annual study How America Pays for College, out last month.

And last year marked the first time a survey by Fastweb.com found that the main reason students didn’t enroll at their top-choice school wasn’t because they didn’t get in, but because they couldn’t afford to go, says Kantrowitz, who used to be the publisher of the site.

Job prospects have also become part of the conversation much earlier as families worry about how their kids will be able to pay off debt. Katy Murphy, director of college counseling at Bellarmine College Preparatory, an all-boys Jesuit high school in San Jose, Calif., says more parents she talks to are interested in colleges with co-op programs. Co-ops build work experience into the curriculum — students take a semester to work for a company, get paid for it, then return to the classroom. They often boost the possibility of job offers after graduation, she says.

Some interviewed by USA TODAY also mentioned the importance of considering that where you plan to look for a job will affect how much you’re paid. Samantha Reeves, 29, says she would have reconsidered ever going to law school if she had realized how much she’d start out making in her hometown of Columbia, Mo., compared with a larger city.

Reeves, who now works as a writer for Veterans United Home Loans, has more than $60,000 in student loan debt from law school.

“It’s really expensive,” she says, “and if I wasn’t going to be able to pay my student loans it doesn’t really seem like the best financial option.”

Hadley Malcolm, USA TODAY7:41 a.m. EDT August 15, 2013

Crime Does Pay (especially when it comes to frivolous estate challenges)

October 27th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted in Estate

Several years ago, a client came to me to help work out language to establish a restricted endowment for someone donating land to establish a camp – all nice stuff.  About year or two later, the client called and said that the donor has passed away.  The endowment agreement never was signed but the donor had done his estate plans without involvement of the charity.  The result: he left everything he had to this charitable organization, including the valuable land and more, around $15 million in total.  No strings, either!  Not that it mattered since the nonprofit knew the donor well enough to create a board restricted fund to meet the donor’s wishes posthumously.  All nice stuff until a long lost relative got notice that great uncle Charlie passed – and all of his money is going to charity, do you object?

So, the client asked me what they should do in the face of the challenge to the estate.  Apparently the donor’s attorney had done everything right, even a video of the client attesting to no undo influence and mental capacity.  Upon hearing these facts, my advice was to hire the largest, nastiest law firm in that state and instruct them to squash the other side.  Having had the misfortune of being in a small law practice and having run up against big law firms, I knew exactly the pain a large firm would put the challenging attorneys through.  Make is so not worth their time and money that they will walk away.  In any case, the charity’s bequest was completely solid – it was just a matter of time (they just didn’t want to wait years for the funds).

The client consulted with a top law firm in the state and lo and behold, they settled with the family – a few hundred thousand to send the great nephew off in style.

I found out that what would normally be considered a frivolous law suit (estate challenges only can be instituted by someone who would have received estate funds had the person died without a will – i.e. a next-in-line descendant), was actually a smart move.

Kin of heiress Huguette Clark in talks to receive share of $300 million estate.” Click the title if you want to see the article!

All not surprising – the whole story was a ruse from the start to squeeze some bucks out of the estate.  All of the accusations, negative stories about the estate attorney and accountant, the law suit against the hospital, all of it was for one purpose and one purpose only: how much money can we (the relatives who had nothing whatsoever to do with Ms. Clark) get out of the old lady – who to their chagrin lived to the ripe old age of 104 and only signed a will very late in the game.  Ironically and perhaps with divine justice, Ms. Clark outlived so many of the family who were to me scheming and planning and waiting to get her money (having squandered their wealth over the years).  It could have been billions of dollars, too, had her assets been managed professionally.

Here is a snip-it from the linked article that says it all:  “Fourteen of the 19 said in legal papers that they never met their reclusive aunt. The last time any of them recalled speaking with her in person was in 1957, although some said hello when their parents were on the phone with Huguette on holidays.”  I think they were stretching the truth even there.  Ms. Clark was a recluse and these “relatives” were descendants of her half-siblings (all of whom were adults when she was born) who probably didn’t appreciate their father’s new late in life family.

So what do we walk away with from these stories?  The unfortunate reality is that estate challenges – from next-of-kin only – don’t follow the normal “frivolous law suit” standard that other legal cases do.  There is almost no way around it.  Planned giving fundraisers – do your best to make sure family knows what your donors are doing, keep good files and don’t be surprised when the family fights the will.  Usually it is the long lost nieces and nephews and other more distant relatives who fight the most.  No guilt about their parents, just greed and easy money.

Jonathan Gudema

The Planned Giving Blog

Unease at Clinton Foundation Over Finances and Ambitions

October 26th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted in Information

Soon after the 10th anniversary of the foundation bearing his name, Bill Clinton met with a small group of aides and two lawyers from Simpson Thacher & Bartlett. Two weeks of interviews with Clinton Foundation executives and former employees had led the lawyers to some unsettling conclusions.

The review echoed criticism of Mr. Clinton’s early years in the White House: For all of its successes, the Clinton Foundation had become a sprawling concern, supervised by a rotating board of old Clinton hands, vulnerable to distraction and threatened by conflicts of interest. It ran multimillion-dollar deficits for several years, despite vast amounts of money flowing in.

And concern was rising inside and outside the organization about Douglas J. Band, a onetime personal assistant to Mr. Clinton who had started a lucrative corporate consulting firm — which Mr. Clinton joined as a paid adviser — while overseeing the Clinton Global Initiative, the foundation’s glitzy annual gathering of chief executives, heads of state, and celebrities.

The review set off more than a year of internal debate, and spurred an evolution in the organization that included Mr. Clinton’s daughter, Chelsea, taking on a dominant new role as the family grappled with the question of whether the foundation — and its globe-spanning efforts to combat AIDS, obesity and poverty — would survive its founder.

Now those efforts are taking on new urgency. In the coming weeks, the foundation, long Mr. Clinton’s domain since its formation in 2001, will become the nerve center of Hillary Rodham Clinton’s increasingly busy public life.

This fall, Mrs. Clinton and her staff will move into offices at the foundation’s new headquarters in Midtown Manhattan, occupying two floors of the Time-Life Building. Amid speculation about her 2016 plans, Mrs. Clinton is adding major new initiatives on women, children and jobs to what has been renamed the Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation.

Worried that the foundation’s operating revenues depend too heavily on Mr. Clinton’s nonstop fund-raising, the three Clintons are embarking on a drive to raise an endowment of as much as $250 million, with events already scheduled in the Hamptons and London. And after years of relying on Bruce R. Lindsey, the former White House counsel whose friendship with Mr. Clinton stretches back decades, to run the organization while living part-time in Arkansas, the family has hired a New York-based chief executive with a background in management consulting.

“We’re trying to institutionalize the foundation so that it will be here long after the lives of any of us,” Mr. Lindsey said. “That’s our challenge and that is what we are trying to address.”

But the changing of the guard has aggravated long-simmering tensions within the former first family’s inner circle as the foundation tries to juggle the political and philanthropic ambitions of a former president, a potential future president, and their increasingly visible daughter.

And efforts to insulate the foundation from potential conflicts have highlighted just how difficult it can be to disentangle the Clintons’ charity work from Mr. Clinton’s moneymaking ventures and Mrs. Clinton’s political future, according to interviews with more than two dozen former and current foundation employees, donors and advisers to the family. Nearly all of them declined to speak for attribution, citing their unwillingness to alienate the Clinton family.

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Last Thursday, Mr. Clinton arrived two hours late to an exuberant welcome at a health clinic about 60 miles north of Johannesburg. Children in zebra-striped loincloths sang as Mr. Clinton and Ms. Clinton made their entrance, and the former president enthusiastically explained how his foundation had helped the South African government negotiate large reductions in the price of drugs that halt the progress of HIV. Aaron Motsoaledi, South Africa’s minister of health, heaped praise on the effort. “Because of your help we are able to treat three and a half times more people than we used to,” he told the crowd.

The project is typical of the model pioneered by the Clinton Foundation, built around dozens of partnerships with private companies, governments, or other nonprofit groups. Instead of handing out grants, the foundation recruits donors and advises them on how best to deploy their money or resources, from helping Procter & Gamble donate advanced water-purification packets to developing countries to working with credit card companies to expand the volume of low-cost loans offered to poor inner city residents.

The foundation, which has 350 employees in 180 countries, remains largely powered by Mr. Clinton’s global celebrity and his ability to connect corporate executives, A-listers and government officials. On this month’s Africa trip, Mr. Clinton was accompanied by the actors Dakota Fanning and Jesse Eisenberg and the son of the New York City mayoral candidate John A. Catsimatidis, a longtime donor.

For most of the foundation’s existence, its leadership has been dominated by loyal veterans of the Clintons’ political lives. Ira C. Magaziner, who was a Rhodes scholar with Mr. Clinton and ran Mrs. Clinton’s failed attempt at a health care overhaul in the 1990s, is widely credited as the driving force behind the foundation’s largest project, the Clinton Health Access Initiative, which, among other efforts, negotiates bulk purchasing agreements and price discounts on lifesaving medicines.

Mr. Band, who arrived at the White House in 1995 and worked his way up to become Mr. Clinton’s closest personal aide, standing behind the president on golf courses and the global stage, helped build the foundation’s fund-raising structure. He conceived of and for many years helped run the Clinton Global Initiative, the annual conference that draws hundreds of business leaders and heads of state to New York City where attendees are pushed to make specific philanthropic commitments.

Today, big-name companies vie to buy sponsorships at prices of $250,000 and up, money that has helped subsidize the foundation’s annual operating costs. Last year, the foundation and two subsidiaries had revenues of more than $214 million.

Yet the foundation’s expansion has also been accompanied by financial problems. In 2007 and 2008, the foundation also found itself competing against Mrs. Clinton’s presidential campaign for donors amid a recession. Millions of dollars in contributions intended to seed an endowment were diverted to other programs, creating tension between Mr. Magaziner and Mr. Band. The foundation piled up a $40 million deficit during those two years, according to tax returns. Last year, it ran more than $8 million in the red.

Amid those shortfalls, the foundation has sometimes catered to donors and celebrities who gave money in ways that raised eyebrows in the low-key nonprofit world. In 2009, during a Clinton Global Initiative gathering at the University of Texas at Austin, the foundation purchased a first-class ticket for the actress Natalie Portman, a special guest, who brought her beloved Yorkie, according to two former foundation employees.

In interviews, foundation officials partly blamed the 2008 recession and difficulties in getting donors to provide operating support rather than restricted grants for specific programs for the deficits.

But others criticized Mr. Magaziner, who is widely seen within the foundation as impulsive and lacking organizational skills. On one occasion, Mr. Magaziner dispatched a team of employees to fly around the world for months gathering ideas for a climate change proposal that never got off the ground. Another time, he ignored a report — which was commissioned at significant expense from the consulting firm McKinsey & Company — on how the foundation could get involved in forestry initiatives.

Mr. Magaziner’s management style and difficulty keeping projects within budget were also raised in discussions that surrounded the 2011 Simpson Thacher review. (One person who attended a meeting with Mr. Magaziner recalled his lying on a conference room table in the middle of the meeting because of terrible back spasms, snapping at a staff member.)

Mr. Band repeatedly urged Mr. Clinton to fire Mr. Magaziner, according to people briefed on the matter. Mr. Clinton refused, confiding in aides that despite Mr. Magaziner’s managerial weaknesses, he was a visionary with good intentions. The former president, according to one person who knows them both, “thinks Ira is brilliant — and brilliant people get away with a lot in Clinton world.”

Indeed, by then, Mr. Magaziner had persuaded Mr. Clinton and the foundation to spin the health initiative off into a separate organization, with Mr. Magaziner as its chief executive and the Clinton Foundation appointing a majority of its board members. The financial problems continued. In 2010 and 2011, the first two years when the health initiative operated as a stand-alone organization, it ran annual shortfalls of more than $4 million. A new chief financial officer, hired in 2010, left eight months later.

A foundation official said the health initiative had only three chief financial officers in 10 years and that its financial problem was a common one in the nonprofit world: For all the grant money coming in — more than $160 million in 2011 — Mr. Magaziner had also had difficulty raising money for operating costs. But by the end of 2011, the health initiative had expanded its board, adding two seats. Chelsea Clinton took one.

Growing Ventures

As the foundation grew, so did the outside business ventures pursued by Mr. Clinton and several of his aides.

None have drawn more scrutiny in Clinton circles than Teneo, a firm co-founded in 2009 by Mr. Band, described by some as a kind of surrogate son to Mr. Clinton. Aspiring to merge corporate consulting, public relations and merchant banking in a single business, Mr. Band poached executives from Wall Street, recruited other Clinton aides to join as employees or advisers and set up shop in a Midtown office formerly belonging to one of the country’s top hedge funds.

By 2011, the firm had added a third partner, Declan Kelly, a former State Department envoy for Mrs. Clinton. And Mr. Clinton had signed up as a paid adviser to the firm.

Teneo worked on retainer, charging monthly fees as high as $250,000, according to current and former clients. The firm recruited clients who were also Clinton Foundation donors, while Mr. Band and Mr. Kelly encouraged others to become new foundation donors. Its marketing materials highlighted Mr. Band’s relationship with Mr. Clinton and the Clinton Global Initiative, where Mr. Band sat on the board of directors through 2011 and remains an adviser. Some Clinton aides and foundation employees began to wonder where the foundation ended and Teneo began.

Those worries intensified after the collapse of MF Global, the international brokerage firm led by Jon S. Corzine, a former governor of New Jersey, in the fall of 2011. The firm had been among Teneo’s earliest clients, and its collapse over bad European investments — while paying $125,000 a month for the firm’s public relations and financial advice — drew Teneo and the Clintons unwanted publicity.

Mr. Clinton ended his advisory role with Teneo in March 2012, after an article appeared in The New York Post suggesting that Mrs. Clinton was angry over the MF Global controversy. A spokesman for Mr. Clinton denied the report. But in a statement released afterward, Mr. Clinton announced that he would no longer be paid by Teneo.

He also praised Mr. Band effusively, crediting him with keeping the foundation afloat and expressing hopes that Mr. Band would continue to advise the Global Initiative.

“I couldn’t have accomplished half of what I have in my post-presidency without Doug Band,” Mr. Clinton said in the statement.

Even that news release was a source of controversy within the foundation, according to two people with knowledge of the discussions. Mr. Band helped edit the statement, which other people around the Clintons felt gave him too much credit for the foundation’s accomplishments. (The quotation now appears as part of Mr. Band’s biography on the Teneo Web site.)

Mr. Band left his paid position with the foundation in late 2010, but has remained involved with C.G.I., as have a number of Teneo clients, like Coca-Cola, Dow Chemical and UBS Americas. Standard Chartered, a British financial services company that paid a $340 million fine to New York regulators last year to settle charges that it had laundered money from Iran, is a Teneo client and a sponsor of the 2012 global initiative.

Last year, Coca-Cola’s chief executive, Muhtar Kent, won a coveted spot on the dais with Mr. Clinton, discussing the company’s partnership with another nonprofit to use its distributors to deliver medical goods to patients in Africa. (A Coca-Cola spokesman said that the company’s sponsorship of foundation initiatives long predated Teneo and that the firm plays no role in Coca-Cola’s foundation work.)

In March 2012, David Crane, the chief executive of NRG, an energy company, led a widely publicized trip with Mr. Clinton to Haiti, where they toured green energy and solar power projects that NRG finances through a $1 million commitment to the Clinton Global Initiative.

Officials said the foundation has established clear guidelines for the Clinton Global Initiative to help prevent any favoritism or special treatment of particular donors or sponsors.

Teneo was not the only worry: other events thrust the foundation into internal turmoil. In 2011, a wave of midlevel program staff members departed, reflecting the frustration of much of the foundation’s policy personnel with the old political hands running the organization. Around the time of the Simpson Thacher review, Mr. Lindsey suffered a stroke, underscoring concerns about the foundation’s line of succession. John D. Podesta, a chief of staff in Mr. Clinton’s White House, stepped in for several months as temporary chief executive.

While much attention has focused on Mrs. Clinton’s emerging role within the foundation, advisers to the family say her daughter’s growing involvement could prove more critical in the years ahead. After years of pursuing other career paths, including working at McKinsey & Company and a hedge fund, Ms. Clinton, 33, has begun to assert herself as a force within the foundation. Her perspective is shaped far more than her parents’ by her time in the world of business, and she is poised to play a significant role in shaping the foundation’s future, particularly if Mrs. Clinton chooses to run for president.

She formally joined the foundation’s board in 2011, marking her growing role there — and the start of intensifying tensions between her and Mr. Band. Several people close to the Clintons said that she became increasingly concerned with the negative impact Mr. Band’s outside business might have on her father’s work and that she cited concerns raised during the internal review about potential conflicts of interest involving Teneo.

It was Ms. Clinton who suggested that the newly installed chief executive, Eric Braverman, be considered for the job during a nearly two-year search. A friend and a former colleague from McKinsey, Mr. Braverman, 38, had helped the Clintons with philanthropic projects in Haiti after the earthquake there. And his hiring coincided with Ms. Clinton’s appointment as the vice chairwoman of the foundation board, where she will bear significant responsibility for steering her family’s philanthropy, both in the causes it tackles and in the potential political and financial conflicts it must avoid.

Ms. Clinton has also grown worried that the foundation she stood to inherit would collapse without her father, who turns 67 next week. Mr. Clinton, who had quadruple-bypass surgery in 2004 and no longer eats meat or dairy products, talks frequently about his own mortality.

Mr. Catsimatidis said Ms. Clinton “has to learn how to deal with the whole world because she wants to follow in the footsteps of her father and her mother.”

Shifting the Emphasis

Over the years, the foundation has dived into virtually any cause that sparked Mr. Clinton’s interest: childhood obesity in the United States, sustainable farming in South America, mentoring entrepreneurs, saving elephants from poaching, and more. That list will shift soon as Mrs. Clinton and Chelsea build their staffs to focus on issues including economically empowering women and combating infant mortality.

In the coming months, as Mrs. Clinton mulls a 2016 presidential bid, the foundation could also serve as a base for her to home in on issues and to build up a stable of trusted staff members who could form the core of a political campaign.

Mrs. Clinton’s staff at the foundation’s headquarters includes Maura Pally, a veteran aide who advised her 2008 presidential campaign and worked at the State Department, and Madhuri Kommareddi, a former policy aide to President Obama.

Dennis Cheng, Mrs. Clinton’s deputy chief of protocol at the State Department and a finance director of her presidential campaign, will oversee the endowment drive, which some of the Clintons’ donors already describe as a dry run for 2016.

And Mrs. Clinton’s personal staff of roughly seven people — including Huma Abedin, wife of the New York mayoral candidate Anthony D. Weiner — will soon relocate from a cramped Washington office to the foundation’s headquarters. They will work on organizing Mrs. Clinton’s packed schedule of paid speeches to trade groups and awards ceremonies and assist in the research and writing of Mrs. Clinton’s memoir about her time at the State Department, to be published by Simon & Schuster next summer.

 

Published in the New York Times: August 13, 2013

By  and 

Lydia Polgreen contributed reporting, and Kitty Bennett contributed research.

White House Pursues Online Privacy Bill Amid NSA Efforts

October 25th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted in In The Spotlight

Even as it defends the National Security Agency’s controversial Internet surveillance programs, the Obama administration has been working on legislation to boost online privacy safeguards for consumers.

The fact that the administration is trying to advance such a measure — amid reports that the government can access people’s online communications — speaks to growing tensions with Europe over privacy. Top European Union officials have called for tighter data rules for U.S. Internet companies, and a base-line privacy bill would strengthen the administration’s hand in negotiating with Europe.

“The revelations of NSA surveillance have kicked into high gear European pressure on the United States to move privacy legislation forward,” said Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center.

The administration’s proposal builds on the Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights, a blueprint the White House released last year, sources familiar with the plan said. The bill would define privacy rights and convene Internet companies and consumer advocates to hammer out industry codes of conduct based on the principles. The FTC would have the authority to enforce the codes of conduct generated by those talks.

The administration hasn’t finalized the measure but is trying to build support for it on Capitol Hill, a source with direct knowledge of the effort said. It’s not clear what impact the government shutdown has had on the effort.

“The critical path to moving something forward is to work with people in Congress,” the source said. “Suffice it to say, if this were a matter of the administration producing a bill, it would be out there already.”

The White House referred questions to the Commerce Department, which is helping to draft the legislation. A Commerce Department spokesperson declined to comment.

While the administration has been actively working on the bill since early this year, Edward Snowden’s NSA leaks have complicated the effort. On one hand, the surveillance revelations have prompted European officials to raise new concerns about U.S. Internet companies, adding urgency to the White House push for a privacy bill. But it also has made such legislation a tougher political sell, given the backlash against the NSA’s own controversial data collection.

What’s more, there’s been little appetite in Congress for legislating consumer privacy in recent years. A bill to create an online Do Not Track system failed to advance this year, as did broader privacy legislation from then-Sen. John Kerry (D-Mass.) and Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) in 2011.

“We continue to favor industry self-regulation and agreements between Internet companies and their users as they are proven methods for safeguarding users’ privacy while maintaining flexibility for continued creativity and innovation online,” said Michael Beckerman, president of the Internet Association, whose members include Google, Facebook and Amazon.

Rep. Lee Terry (R-Neb.), chairman of the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee overseeing consumer protection issues, said the White House reached out to him on its privacy legislation. But he said lawmakers are still getting up to speed on the complex issues involved.

“It’s very complicated, and frankly, there’s only a handful of people in here that have immersed themselves enough on that particular issue,” said Terry, who has launched a House task force on privacy. “It is so complex and so delicate, and there are so many interests that it’s really hard for someone to get their mind around it if they don’t immerse themselves. … You don’t have people just rushing to that issue.”

A Senate Commerce Committee spokesman said the White House is still refining its ideas and hasn’t shared legislative language yet. The panel’s chairman, Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.), is a longtime privacy advocate who reintroduced the Do Not Track bill in February.

The code-of-conduct approach has become the administration’s preferred method for creating privacy standards.

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration has invited industry and consumer groups to develop a code of conduct for the way mobile apps explain their data practices to users. The administration has supported efforts by the World Wide Web Consortium to create an industrywide Do Not Track standard, though that effort has stumbled after a large advertiser coalition pulled out last month. And President Barack Obama’s February executive order calls on industry to help develop voluntary cybersecurity standards.

Still, some trade groups are sounding a warning about the impact privacy legislation could have on companies that rely on user data.

“In any instance, it is vital that legislation not undercut the business models that fuel the Internet economy,” said Rachel Thomas, vice president of government affairs at the Direct Marketing Association, whose organization has discussed the bill with administration officials. “We need to be cautious about going down any legislative path that would have a negative impact on jobs and economic growth.”

By ALEX BYERS | 10/7/13 5:03 AM EDT

Politico

7 Magical Words to Earn Respect, Trust, and Appreciation

October 25th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted in Fundraising

I want to give you seven wonderful words that can help you earn the respect, trust, and appreciation of your prospects and donors.

Before I give you the magical phrase, I want you to know that I recognize that this post is about something that is common sense. However, given a couple of my wife’s recent encounters, I can tell you that just because the miraculous phrase is common sense does not mean it’s usage is common practice.

That’s why I’m going to share it with you here:

I don’t know, but I’ll find out.”

Many nonprofit professionals think they need to know the answer to every question a prospect or donor asks. They think if they do not readily know the answer, they’ll appear stupid, ignorant, incompetent, or all of these or worse. So, they make any number of mistakes when they’re stumped, including:

1. They side step the inquiry. In a classic deflection move, some development professionals will simply acknowledge the question and then change the subject. Inside, they think, “Whew! I dodged that one.” Unfortunately, the reality is that the person who made the inquiry will almost definitely notice the dodge and be annoyed by it.

Albert Einstein by Philippe Halsman-1947

2. They start sputtering. In this case, the development professional starts struggling to answer the question but only ends up half answering a bunch of questions that were never asked. While the person who asked the question might find this somewhat amusing, he’ll still notice the original question has gone unanswered.

3. They will make up an answer.Some development professionals will, on occasion, make up an answer. They’ll do this because they think the answer is probably right and that there will be no harm if they’re mistaken. Sometimes, a development professional will outright lie in order to avoid being seen as lacking in information. Unfortunately, in this electronic age, there’s a good chance that the person who gets cute with the facts will end up being caught.

Instead of letting yourself be caught in your own uncomfortable trap, just use the amazingly simple, powerful phrase:

I don’t know, but I’ll find out.”

When you use that phrase, you’ll be telling your prospect or donor:

• I heard you.

• I don’t know everything, but I’ll be honest with you and tell you that.

• Your question or concern is mine.

• I care enough about you to get you the information you need or want.

• I know how to efficiently and effectively solve problems.

• You can trust all my other answers because when I don’t know, I’ll say so.

Using the phrase will also give you the perfect justification for being back in contact with the individual. Because you’ll be addressing something of importance to the person, your contact will be sure to be donor centered.

If you tell someone you’ll find out something and get back to her, just make certain you actually do. If you ultimately can’t find a satisfactory answer to a question, be sure to get back to the prospect or donor anyway. You can still let her know how hard you worked to get an answer, and you can apologize for coming up empty handed.

If you use the phrase effectively, you’ll charm your prospects and donors, you’ll earn their respect and trust, and you’ll receive their appreciation.

If acknowledging the limits of your own knowledge still leaves you feeling a bit uncomfortable, just remember what Albert Einstein, one of the greatest geniuses of all time, once said:

I never commit to memory anything that can easily be looked up in a book.”

Or, find inspiration in the more ancient wisdom of Lao Tzu:

The wise man is one who knows what he does not know.”

 

Posted on August 16, 2013 at 12:01 am

Michael J. Rosen, CFRE

The Direct Marketing Associations Honors 11 Nonprofits With ECHO Awards

October 24th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted in In The Spotlight, Marketing

DMA Presents the 2013 International ECHOTMAwards — Complete List Of Winners

 

Chicago, IL, October 15, 2013 — The Direct Marketing Association (DMA) presented its 2013 International ECHO Awards tonight at McCormick Place West in Chicago, during the DMA2013 Conference & Exhibition, which concludes Thursday, October 17.

The following is a complete list of this year’s International ECHO Awards winners, including the four special awards and the Gold, Silver, and Bronze ECHO winners.

* * *

 SPECIAL 2013 International ECHO Awards Winners

The Diamond ECHO

Consumer Products

Client: Fonterra Brands (Ltd) Tip Top

Agency: Colenso BBDO/Proximity New Zealand

Campaign: Feel Tip Top

 

Henry Hoke Award

Sponsored by Hoke Communications, Inc.

Insurance

Client: PNozorg

Agency: TBWA/NEBOKO DOWNTOWN

Campaign: The Boring Guys

 

Personal Connections ECHO Award

Sponsored by Pitney Bowes

Insurance

Client: MAPFRE Insurance Brazil

Agency: DirectOne Brazil

Campaign: Making insurance simple with less cost and increased relationship

 

USPS Gold Mailbox Award

Sponsored by the United States Postal Service

Not-for-Profit

Client: Chill Out E.V.

Agency: Wunderman Germany

Campaign: Pencil Case

GOLD 2013 International ECHO Awards Winners

Automotive

Client: Volkswagen-Audi España S.A.

Agency: CP Proximity

Campaign: THE FIRST EMAIL TEST DRIVE

 

Consumer Products

Client: Fonterra Brands (Ltd) Tip Top

Agency: Colenso BBDO/Proximity New Zealand

Campaign: Feel Tip Top

 

Consumer Products

Client: Unilever Philippines

Agency: OgilvyOne Worldwide Manila

Campaign: Ponds Face my Love

 

Consumer Products

Client: Beyond Dark

Agency: OgilvyOne Worldwide London

Campaign: Measure of Pleasure

 

Financial Products and Services

Client: TRY

Agency: TRY Reklameybrå AS

Campaign: SUPERSAVE

 

Information Technologies

Client: GOOGLE Singapore

Agency: Ogilvy & Mather Singapore

Campaign: ‘Chrome Experiment: Ramakien’

 

Insurance

Client: PNozorg

Agency: TBWA/NEBOKO DOWNTOWN

Campaign: The Boring Guys

 

Not-for-Profit

Client: Chill Out E.V.

Agency: Wunderman Germany

Campaign: Pencil Case

 

Not-for-Profit

Client: Food for the Poor

Agency: Food for the Poor, Inc.

Campaign: A Stitch and a Prayer

 

Not-for-Profit

Client: World Vision Canada

Agency: Russ Reid

Campaign: Horn of Africa Crisis Response

 

Not-for-Profit

Client: ASPCA

Agency: True North, Inc.

Campaign: ASPCA: Cracking the Donor Code

 

Pharmaceutical/Healthcare

Client: Kimberly-Clark

Agency: Ogilvy New York

Campaign: Generation Know

 

Publishing/Entertainment

Client: Chicago Shakespeare Theater

Agency: Iris Mobile

Campaign: George and Will Come to Life

 

Publishing/Entertainment

Client: Bud Fox AB

Agency: TBWA

Campaign: The Ice Record Project

 

Retail/Direct Sales

Client: DES’S

Agency: VCCP Spain

Campaign: MY MATTRESS SAVINGS BANK

 

Travel & Hospitality/Transportation

Client: V/Line

Agency: McCann Melbourne

Campaign: Guilt Trips

SILVER 2013 International ECHO Awards Winners

 

Automotive

Client: Volkswagen-Audi España S.A.

Agency: CP Proximity

Campaign: RAPIDPEDIA

 

Automotive

Client: Volkswagen-Audi España S.A.

Agency: CP Proximity

Campaign: ŠKODA CHANGE MY CAR

 

Business and Consumer Services

Client: United Parcel Service General Services Co.

Agency: Ogilvy

Campaign: Go West—The Journey of Terracotta Warrior to the U.S.

 

Communications/Utilities

Client: Halebop

Agency: Smicker

Campaign: Bop to the top!! A challenging, brand new loyalty concept for Sweden’s most satisfied mobile customers

 

Communications/Utilities

Client: Vodafone, India

Agency: OgilvyOne Worldwide, Mumbai

Campaign: Bringing Alive the Blackberry Boys on Social Media

 

Communications/Utilities

Client: Vodafone, India

Agency: OgilvyOne Worldwide, Mumbai

Campaign: Leads worth $700 mln unlocked at $5 per lead

 

Consumer Products

Client: Unilever

Agency: Ogilvy & Mather/OgilvyOne Worldwide

Campaign: Reflections

 

Consumer Products

Client: MARS NZ

Agency: Colenso BBDO/Proximity New Zealand

Campaign: Donation Glasses

 

Consumer Products

Client: Frucor

Agency: The Hallway

Campaign: Mizone Zonelab

 

Consumer Products

Client: Unilever Canada

Agency: Ogilvy & Mather/OgilvyOne Worldwide

Campaign: Photoshop Action

 

Consumer Products

Client: Frucor Beverages Ltd

Agency: Colenso BBDO/Proximity New Zealand

Campaign: The V Motion Project

 

Consumer Products

Client: The North Face

Agency: Ogilvy

Campaign: Go Wild

 

Education

Client: Regent University

Agency: Tocquigny

Campaign: FY ‘13 Student Acquisition Campaign

 

Education

Client: Danish Defence Recruitment Branch

Agency: Relationshuset Gekko

Campaign: Train with the Danish Defence – like 188,056 other

 

Financial Products and Services

Client: ABN AMRO

Agency: Van Wanten Etcetera

Campaign: Queensday cashbox

 

Information Technologies

Client: IBM China

Agency: Ogilvy Beijing

Campaign: Parallel Paths

 

Information Technologies

Client: IBM

Agency: OgilvyOne London

Campaign: IBM Wimbeldon Smarter Fans

 

Information Technologies

Client: IBM Australia

Agency: OgilvyOne Australia

Campaign: CIOs cut out to lunch

 

Insurance

Client: GEICO

Agency: The Martin Agency

Campaign: GEICO Radical Accessibility – “Maxwell”

 

Insurance

Client: Ethias

Agency: BBDO Belgium

Campaign: Ethias – Neighbourhood Fixers

 

Not-for-Profit

Client: American Cancer Society

Agency: Russ Reid

Campaign: Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Campaign

 

Not-for-Profit

Client: FAD – Anti-drug Foundation

Agency: Shackleton

Campaign: 144 Hours

 

Not-for-Profit

Client: Operation Smile

Agency: Russ Reid

Campaign: Stock an Operating Room Campaign

 

Pharmaceutical/Healthcare

Client: Laboratorios Alter

Agency: Shackleton

Campaign: Flutown

 

Product Manufacturing and Distribution

Client: Nexans

Agency: Mecka

Campaign: The Coconut

 

Professional Services

Client: IBM

Agency: Ogilvy New York

Campaign: IBMblr

 

Publishing/Entertainment

Client: Reliance Industries Limited

Agency: OgilvyOne Worldwide, Mumbai

Campaign: The Mumbai Indians

 

Retail/Direct Sales

Client: Pão De Açúcar

Agency: Giovanni+Draftfcb

Campaign: BIRTHDAY MESSAGES – THE APP THAT BECAME A BOOK

 

Retail/Direct Sales

Client: Vodafone, India

Agency: OgilvyOne Worldwide, Mumbai

Campaign: 30% more Vodafone employees are “Happy to Help”

 

Travel & Hospitality/Transportation

Client: Swedish Insitute

Agency: Volontaire

Campaign: Curators of Sweden

 

Travel & Hospitality/Transportation

Client: British Airways

Agency: OgilvyOne London

Campaign: Mosaic

BRONZE 2013 International ECHO Awards Winners

Automotive

Client: BMW Canada

Agency: Rivet Global

Campaign: BMW 2012 Conquest Program

 

Automotive

Client: BMW Group Czech Republic

Agency: Proximity Prague

Campaign: BMW 7 Series and You

 

Automotive

Client: Piaggio Vehicles Pvt. Ltd

Agency: OgilvyOne Worldwide, Mumbai

Campaign: Once Upon a Vespa

 

Business and Consumer Services

Client: Kirin Company, Limited

Agency: DAIKO Advertising, Inc.

Campaign: 1,000,000 Genki Song Project

 

Business and Consumer Services

Client: UPS

Agency: Ogilvy New York

Campaign: Flypaper

 

Business and Consumer Services

Client: Mannaz

Agency: RelationshusetGekko

Campaign: Sold-out

 

Communications/Utilities

Client: Halebop

Agency: Smicker

Campaign: Bop News – A different newsletter for those sceptical of advertising in general

 

Communications/Utilities

Client: DCC Energi

Agency: Mediabroker/Cool Gray

Campaign: The Red Card

 

Consumer Products

Client: Frucor Beverages Ltd

Agency: Colenso BBDO/Proximity New Zealand

Campaign: The V Motion Project

 

Consumer Products

Client: Hindustan Unilever Limited

Agency: NetCORE Solutions

Campaign: HUL Active Wheel – Rural Missed Call Campaign

 

Consumer Products

Client: Affinity PetCare S.A.

Agency: CP Proximity

Campaign: PET FOOD RELEASE

 

Consumer Products

Client: Unilever Canada

Agency: OgilvyOne Worldwide Toronto

Campaign: Women Who Should Be Famous

 

Education

Client: MG54

Agency: MG54

Campaign: #May1810

 

Financial Products and Services

Client: AIR MILES Reward Program

Agency: Squareknot

Campaign: BMO Ticket to Paradise and the AIR MILES Reward Program

 

Financial Products and Services

Client: American Express

Agency: OgilvyOne

Campaign: Talking Tags

 

Financial Products and Services

Client: ATP

Agency: Hjatelin Stahl

Campaign: PensionClass

 

Financial Products and Services

Client: Aditya Birla Money

Agency: M&C Saatchi

Campaign: Hastakshar Mudra

 

Financial Products and Services

Client: Birla Sun Life Mutual Fund

Agency: M&C Saatchi

Campaign: Laxmi Papad

 

Information Technologies

Client: IBM

Agency: OgilvyOne Worldwide

Campaign: Everything comes alive with IBM

 

Information Technologies

Client: IBM

Agency: Ogilvy New York

Campaign: US Open Live Shazam Experience

 

Insurance

Client: Nationwide Insurance

Agency: Wilde Agency

Campaign: HRC Turnaround

 

Insurance

Client: American Family Insurance

Agency: Ogilvy & Mather

Campaign: American Dreams Campaign

 

Insurance

Client: Grupo Banco Do Brasil & MAPFRE Seguros

Agency: Direct One

Campaign: Making insurance simple with less cost and increased relationship

 

Insurance

Client: EmblemHealth

Agency: Hacker Group

Campaign: Lunch Pail

 

Not-for-Profit

Client: Fundación Once & FSC Inserta

Agency: Shackleton

Campaign: Never Give Up Plan

 

Not-For-Profit

Client: Amnesty International

Agency: Colenso BBDO/Proximity New Zealand

Campaign: Trial by Timeline

 

Not-for-Profit

Client: Inspiring Denmark

Agency: adtention

Campaign: How to recruit a complete ambassador corps with a strong visual identity and a little chocolate.

 

Not-for-Profit

Client: The Norwegian Cancer Society

Agency: Bouvet

Campaign: We are all different

 

Pharmaceutical/Healthcare

Client: Bupa Care Services

Agency: The Hallway

Campaign: Bupa Home Truths

 

Pharmaceutical/Healthcare

Client: Simply You Pharmaceuticals a.s

Agency: Ogilvy & Mather, Prague

Campaign: The Erection Blister

 

Product Manufacturing and Distribution

Client: Heineken

Agency: Shackleton

Campaign: Snatch Desperados

 

Product Manufacturing and Distribution

Client: Nestle (China) Ltd.

Agency: Ogilvy Beijing

Campaign: BenNaNa Brings Magic Fun

 

Product Manufacturing and Distribution

Client: The Coca-Cola Company

Agency: OgilvyOne

Campaign: Sprite Minalakhir

 

Professional Services

Client: FLSmidth

Agency: Klausen + Partners

Campaign: Find Your Hidden Treasure

 

Retail/Direct Sales

Client: Bar Posto 6

Agency: e|ou mkt de relacionamento

Campaign: Feijoada and the Beanstalk

 

Retail/Direct Sales

Client: Pão De Açúcar

Agency: Giovanni+Draft FCB

Campaign: FORTUNE COOKIE – THE BIRTHDAY CARD THAT CHANGED THE LIVES OF THOSE WHO HAS NEVER

 

Retail/Direct Sales

Client: IKEA USA

Agency: Ogilvy New York

Campaign: The Life Improvement Project

 

Travel & Hospitality/Transportation

Client: TripAdvisor

Agency: Wilde Agency

Campaign: Selling the product no one wants

 

Travel & Hospitality/Transportation

Client: Royal Caribbean

Agency: e|ou mkt de relacionamento

Campaign: Caribbean

 

For more information about the International ECHO Awards, please visitwww.dma-echo.org.

Record Crowd Ushers In A New Year At Annual Kickoff Luncheon

October 24th, 2013 | No Comments | Posted in Annual Giving, Education

Aug 22, 2013

The 2013 Texas Tech fall sports season is officially underway thanks to one of the most successful and well-orchestrated Red Raider Club Kickoff Luncheons in school history.

Today’s record crowd helped not only kick off the Kliff Kingsbury era at Texas Tech but also provided a jump-start to all fall sports including soccer, volleyball and cross country.

“Today, Red Raider Club members and fans really brought the energy and excitement to the RRC Luncheon,” Amy Heard, Associate AD/Red Raider Club stated. “Attendance at events like these and home sporting events, like Sunday’s soccer home opener, really make a difference for our student-athletes. It was a great celebration of the student-athletes that represent our institution in cross country, volleyball, soccer and football. ”

Fans in attendance were treated to yet another rousing speech from head soccer coach Tom Stone who brought the house down with this comment on Kingsbury.

“We see young; we see handsome; we see exciting; we see nouveau, and I heard these people saying, ‘He is going to save Texas Tech Football.’ And I’m thinking, `Are you kidding? You know where he worked last year? We saved him!’”

Following speeches from Jon Murray (Cross Country), Don Flora (Volleyball), Kent Hance (Chancellor), Dr. Duane Nellis (President) and Kirby Hocutt (Athletics Director), it was football’s time to take the stage.

“It’s been an incredible eight months,” Kingsbury began. “The reception we have received from this town has been overwhelming. The support has come in from everywhere and I can’t tell you how proud we are as a staff to be back at Texas Tech.”

After introducing the 2013 senior class, Kingsbury handed the microphone over to defensive coordinator Matt Wallerstedtand co-offensive coordinator Sonny Cumbie. Wallerstedt got the crowd on its feet after laying down a $100 bill with a promise of a sack in the first two minutes of the SMU game. Fans can make financial pledges on sacks by the Tech defense this season with all proceeds going to the Ronald McDonald House of Lubbock. Click for more information.

Today’s luncheon follows a milestone announcement last week in which the Red Raider Club announced a new record for annual giving. For the first time in history, the RRC eclipsed the $5 million mark in annual giving and will provide more than $5.3 million that will go directly to the student-athlete experience. The distribution is $700,000 more than last year’s mark of $4.6 million and represents the single-largest growth between fiscal years in history.

Additionally, this will mark the first time that annual giving funds have completely covered the student-athlete scholarship costs for the fall, spring and summer semesters.